Lectures meet just one time, for two hours.

Courses

2018 Spring2018 Summer2018 Fall
OF 0004.37 How Early Experiences Shape Our Brains

Most of us have heard that our early experiences are important for development, but have you ever wondered why? How exactly do early-life experiences affect a fetus, and why do they alter physical and behavioral development? Explore the incredible flexibility of the human brain and how it learns throughout different stages of life. Discover the difference between myths and research-supported findings of both positive and negative experiences on brain development. Learn more about the wide range of effects that can result from prenatal drug exposure, including alcohol and cannabis. Learn how researchers continually work to better understand the adaptability of the brain, how our experiences may affect this flexibility, and how we develop effective interventions to lessen undesired consequences.

Format: 60% Lecture, 20% Interactive discussion, 20% Demonstration


Course Date(s)

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Instructors
Kristen Breit
OF 0004.38 The Politics of Social Media: How Twitter and Other Platforms Have Revolutionized Political Speech

We live in an age where social media has revolutionized if not weaponized political speech. From the pope to our president, Twitter allows the most powerful voices in the world to speak to us directly, 24 hours a day. Join us for a wild ride through the virtual roller coaster we live on, as we learn how to decipher political messages from social media content. We’ll also discuss how the court of public opinion influences social thought, and how social media is a more effective platform for political speech than any other method of communication.

Format: 60% Lecture, 15% Interactive discussion, 15% Hands-on activity, 10% Demonstration


Course Date(s)

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Instructors
Wendy Patrick
OF 0004.39 Light in the Queen's Garden: 19th Century Prayer and Politics in Hawaii

Aloha! Discover the Hawaiian Islands through the eyes of a woman who experienced the end of the controversial Kingdom of Hawaii before it became a U.S. colony in1898. In her new book, Light in the Queen’s Garden, Dr. Sandra Bonura delves into the life of Ida May Pope, a teacher at a boarding school, who never imagined she would see the 1893 Hawaiian Revolution happen right outside her window. This book takes the reader in a day-by-day accounting of the events surrounding the coup d’état through the eyes of her young pupils. Many of the towering royal personages in Hawai`i’s history — King Kalākaua, Queen Lili’uokalani, Princess Ka`iulani and others — show up in the story as Ida sheltered Hawai`i’s daughters through the frightening and turbulent end of their sovereign nation. Queen Lili’uokalani’s adopted daughter’s long-lost oral history recording, unpublished diaries, correspondence, scrapbooks, and photos tell a story that has never been told before. You don’t want to miss this visual and interactive presentation.

Format: 70% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)

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Instructors
Sandra Bonura
OF 0004.40 Flood-Control Levees on Deltas: What We Learned from the New Orleans Hurricane Katrina Experience

Are you wondering why nature has gone wild with all these hurricanes and accompanying floods? Would you like to understand what causes major river deltas around the globe and mega-cities they host to sink? We'll examine the impact of human alterations and climate change on the Mississippi River Delta and explore the Mississippi River levee system, one of the largest flood-control systems in the world. We'll analyze the New Orleans levee system and reasons behind its failure during Hurricane Katrina, consider implications of the Hurricane Katrina experience on the 2017 hurricane-induced floods, and discuss cost-effective flood-control strategies.

Format: 80% Lecture, 20% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)

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Instructors
Svetlana Kostic
2018 Spring
OF 0004.41 San Diego and The Great War: A Historical Timeline

With Nov. 11, 2018 marking the 100th anniversary of the signing of the armistice that ended World War I, we’ll look at the profound effect the war had on San Diego. Examples include the transformation of Kearny Mesa and Balboa Park into military training camps; bombing practice runs over South Bay; global transmission of naval radio signals from Chollas Heights; and the making of kelp-derived explosives in Chula Vista. Learn how women, ethnic minorities, and benevolent associations contributed to the local war effort; and how San Diegans treated returning war veterans, particularly the disabled. Also learn valuable methods to uncover the stories of individual servicemen and women who made the ultimate sacrifice. Recommended reading: Article written by instructor in the Journal of San Diego History, titled “Help the Horse to Save the Solider: The American Red Star Animal Relief Program at Camp Kearny, 1917–1918.”

Format: 60% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion, 10% Questions & Answers

Course Date(s)
February 21 - February 21
2018 Spring
OF 0004.42 Environmental Justice: A Dwindling Protection or a Global Movement?

Environmental justice is the “fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people regardless of race, color, national origin, or income with respect to the development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations, and policies.” Get an overview of the origins of the EJ movement in the United States and worldwide, and review high-profile cases and outcomes in the U.S. and abroad. We’ll analyze the connection between globalization, climate change, and increasing EJ issues; and discuss the social and economic disruptions that result from globalization, environmental degradation, and human migration. We’ll also look at the current administration’s policy on EJ and how the Department of Defense is dealing with climate change issues.

Format: 80% Lecture, 20% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
February 22 - February 22
2018 Spring
OF 0004.43 Preserving Health and Functionality in Baby Boomers

With roughly 10,000 Americans turning 65 every day, and the 50+ age group now the fastest growing segment in health clubs, how is our society adapting to service them? We’ll share innovative ideas in self-care tailored specifically to the unique demands of baby boomers. Attendees will be able to identify physiological changes associated with the aging process, and learn simple lifestyle practices to improve overall health and functionality.

Format: 40% Lecture, 20% Interactive discussion, 30% Hands-on activity, 10% Demonstration

Course Date(s)
March 9 - March 9
$15
Instructors
Fabio Comana
2018 Spring
OF 0004.45 The Printing Press: Why the Pen is Usually Mightier than the Sword

During the 15th and 16th centuries, the printing press was introduced into European society, and the world would never be the same. The printing press was destined to change the political, intellectual, and religious foundations of European and world civilizations in ways never expected or imagined. Discover how the printing press made its way into Western society, why it created a major revolution that changed the course humanity would take as it entered the modern world, and how it continues to impact human learning and interaction.

Format: 90% Lecture, 10% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
March 15 - March 15
$15
Instructors
Bruno Leone
2018 Spring
OF 0004.46 Social Entrepreneurship: The Business Solution to Poverty

Doing well in business and doing good for society are not mutually exclusive. To see how these objectives can be accomplished simultaneously, we’ll look at the business models of social entrepreneurs with innovative solutions to society's most pressing problems. Examples include the Embrace Baby Warmer developed for poor women in India by a team of graduate students from Stanford University; and Muhammad Yunus’ groundbreaking microloans that empower impoverished people to become economically self-sufficient. Learn how to design a feasible business model for a social business, and identify key partners to help develop, finance, and distribute unique products for people in poverty.

Format: 30% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion, 20% Hands-on activity, 20% Demonstration


Course Date(s)
April 13 - April 13
2018 Spring
OF 0004.48 Rethink Home: Benefits to Rightsizing Your Home and Lifestyle - Senior Stay or Go

Are you an empty nester? Is your home filled with 20+ years of treasures and memories? Are those stairs becoming a little harder to navigate? What now? You are not alone. Explore the full range of options that will allow you to age in your home safely while learning about the world of senior communities — from independent to assisted living. Learn how to correctly utilize Proposition 60/90 (transfer of base-year value), what a "reverse mortgage" is, and the meaning of "rightsizing." Enhance your quality of life as you navigate the aging process by being clear on the personal and financial decisions that will have to be made. Be prepared, have a plan, and enjoy!

Format: 65% Lecture, 35% Interactive discussion

Presenters: Patti Gerke and Ron Greenwald
Patti Gerke and Ron Greenwald specialize in working with older and aging adults and their families when it's time to consider the right housing option. Working closely with estate planning attorneys, aging life specialists, senior move managers, home care agencies, nonprofits and many others in the senior space, Gerke and Greenwald have years of experience in being the project manager for an individual, couple, and their family when it's time to discuss, plan, and implement one's housing options. Having both personally lived the aging experience with their respective parents, over a decade of time, they wish to share their hands-on journey.


Course Date(s)
March 21 - March 21
2018 Spring
OF 0004.51 Charlie Chaplin: A Biography on Film

Gain a new appreciation for a unique aspect of Charlie Chaplin's films — his willingness to reveal his feelings and experiences with his audience. We’ll view several of his most legendary films and use them to illuminate a wide variety of aspects of the performer's life. You may be surprised by some of the many dramatic events and how Chaplin incorporated them into his films.

Format: 40% Lecture, 10% Interactive discussion, 50% Film screenings

Course Date(s)
April 7 - April 7
2018 Spring
OF 0004.52 The Greatest Literary Fraud in History: Shakespeare

This captivating lecture is back by popular demand. We’ll expose the greatest literary cover-up ever, and discuss why Shakespeare could not possibly have written the plays commonly attributed to him. Find out who England’s greatest playwright was, and why Christopher Marlowe was forced to fake his death in 1593. Decipher the cryptic words on Shakespeare’s monument in the church at Stratford-upon-Avon, and explore other intrigues of the Elizabethan court. Immeasurably impress guests at your next cocktail party.

Format: 60% Lecture, 40% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
April 10 - April 10
2018 Spring
OF 0004.53 Baby Boomers on the Threshold: Managing the Transition into Aging

There’s no denying the demographic data — as baby boomers are moving into the “older” or “aging” category, more and more are staying there for 20, 30, or more years. Moving through transitions related to aging — role, status, physical ability, relationships, spirituality — can present challenges and opportunities. Using change consultant William Bridge’s “transition model,” we’ll explore different ways baby boomers respond to steps in the process: endings, neutral zone, and beginnings. Assess whether you’re a denialist, realist, or enthusiast and explore ways to move closer to acceptance and even enthusiasm.

Format: 40% Lecture, 40% Interactive discussion, 20% Hands-on activity


Course Date(s)
April 11 - April 11
2018 Spring
OF 0004.54 Prolonging Human Life

Several years ago, science writer Charles Mann wrote a feature article for the Atlantic Monthly entitled The Coming Death Shortage. The shortage he predicted is rapidly becoming a reality as life-extending medical techniques and therapies, in some cases, double and even triple humanity’s life expectancy. We’ll explore the moral and medical issues — the promise and the peril — that advances in medical technology are bequeathing the Brave New World of the 21st century. Bruno Leone is the author of the book, Disease in History (2016).

Format: 70% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
April 11 - April 11
$15
Instructors
Bruno Leone
2018 Spring
OF 0004.55 Ancient Egypt

The civilization of the ancient Egyptians endured for over 3,000 years. Of particular interest to historians and others is the Old Kingdom, better known as the “Age of the Pyramids.” This presentation will unveil many of Egypt's mysteries and explain why it was one of the most successful and enduring of all the ancient civilizations. Discover how and why the pyramids were built, why it took scholars thousands of years to unlock the mystery of hieroglyphics, the idiosyncrasies of Egyptian medicine, and the fascinating and elaborate process of mummification.

Format: 60% Lecture, 40% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
May 4 - May 4
$15
Instructors
Bruno Leone
2018 Spring
OF 0004.56 Advance-Care Planning at Every Age

Engage in thought provoking discussions about what gives your life meaning, and learn approachable ways to have important advance-care planning discussion with your parents, children, and physician. We’ll discuss engaging and even funny case studies about what happens in the clinical setting when these discussions are properly had and not had.

Format: 40% Lecture, 40% Interactive discussion, 20% Optional advance-care planning hands-on activity


Course Date(s)
May 7 - May 7
2018 Spring
OF 0004.57 Making the Right Turn: Engineering Ethics into Driverless Vehicles

The advent of the self-driving car promises to significantly reduce the 1.25 million traffic deaths that occur each year worldwide by removing their primary cause — human error. However, this technology poses some ethical dilemmas inasmuch as these machines will have to make decisions regarding whom to save or protect in the event of a collision. Those creating the vehicle's algorithm will literally decide who shall live and who shall die. This lesson aims to apply ancient Talmudic considerations to this very modern problem.

Format: 50% Lecture; 50% Interactive discussion


Course Date(s)
April 11 - April 11
2018 Spring
OF 0004.61 The Constitution and Presidential Removal: What’s Clear. What’s Not.

As American politics in general — and presidential politics in particular — have become more polarized, discussions abound about impeachment, presidential incapacity and the 25th Amendment, and whether and when the president may be sued or indicted for alleged law violations. This lecture will explore what the U.S. Constitution and current Supreme Court decisions say about these subjects, and what they leave for the public and public officials to work out. Without taking a position on the merits of removing the current inhabitant of the office, the course will equip students to better understand, and participate in, the ongoing discussions.

Format: 60% Lecture, 40% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
April 25 - April 25