Take the classes you always wanted to take, without assignments, tests or grades. Our instructors are SDSU faculty and other recognized experts in their fields. Each semester offers a new set of courses and activities, on a wide array of topics.

Courses

2019 Spring2019 Summer2019 Fall
OF 0003.123 History of the American Indians from a Decolonizing Perspective

Think you know American History? Think again. If human occupation of the Americas is measured as one hour, native peoples have thrived here for more than 57 minutes; Europeans less than three minutes. We’ll go back several thousands of years and delve into true American history, then explore the effects of European colonization. See how much of our “American” fabric is interlaced with native words, foods, and ecological understanding; assess the Indian policies of Jefferson, Jackson, Lincoln, Nixon, and other presidents; and see how native people have pursued cultural persistence and survival.

Format: 85% Lecture, 15% Interactive

Course Date(s)

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Instructors
Richard Carrico
OF 0003.124 Understanding Globalization through Different Lenses

Raise your awareness of the rapidly shifting ground that’s changing our societies and ways of life from the outside. Learn how we’re changing, the benefits and costs of this process, who the agents and actors are, how we’re responding to this change, and where we’re heading.

Format: 60% Lecture, 40% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)

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Instructors
Eyassu Gayim
2019 Summer
OF 0003.125 How Money Moves

Cash is still king, but electronic money in the form of credit cards, Venmo and e-wallets such as Apple Pay, are winning the hearts of the new generation. Learn about the many alternatives to cash, the companies behind them, and how the entire electronic money system works. Next time you Venmo money to your niece, you’ll know exactly what happens after you click send. We’ll also discuss some of the current developments that will shape the future of payments.

Format: 50% Lecture, 50% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
June 24 - July 15
2019 Summer
OF 0003.126 Global Mythology and Philosophy at Katherine Tingley’s Lomaland Theosophy Community

What do Kumeyaay sacred mountains, dragons, and the Tibetan Book of the Dead have in common? All were studied by theosophists at Katherine Tingley’s Lomaland Community in Point Loma, 1897–1942. Learn about Tingley’s outreach with the Pala Kumeyaay Native Americans; and Kenneth Morris’ novel, The Chalchuite Dragon. We’ll also discuss Tibet scholar (and Cuchama and Sacred Mountains author) W.Y. Evans-Wentz, who brought to the West his translation of the Tibetan Book of the Dead from his global adventures. With over one million copies in print, it transformed our view of death and dying.

Format: 70% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
July 10 - July 17
2019 Fall
OF 0003.127 The Psychological Impact of Living in Two Languages

What does it mean to live in two (or more) languages? Are emotions and feelings experienced differently in different languages? Do bilingual individuals have two selves? Is language more than vocabulary and grammar? What happens when parents and children are fluent in different languages? Using real-life examples, we’ll learn about issues relevant to speaking more than one language. In a world where English dominates the internet and is a second language for many, this course will be interesting to everyone.

Format: 65% Lecture, 35% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
August 5 - August 12
2019 Summer
OF 0003.128 Old-Time Radio: Mystery and Suspense

The Golden Age of Radio was a time of “theater of the mind.” Get a sampling of the many wonderful programs offered in this era, specifically in the genres of mystery and suspense. Just what was that “thing on the fourble board”?

Format: 25% Lecture, 25% Interactive discussion, 50% Listening to radio programs

Course Date(s)
July 20 - July 27
2019 Fall
OF 0003.129 Harmony and Health: Using Music for Health, Wellness, and Mindfulness

Ever wondered why we automatically tap our toes to a steady beat, gravitate toward certain genres of music to work out or to sleep, or why that one song always makes you feel like crying? It’s not a new concept that music has immense power over us; however, the science and understanding behind that power are growing daily. Dive into the research and evidence-based practice of music for relaxation and mindfulness, through the lens of music therapy.

Format: 20% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion, 50% Hands-on activity

Course Date(s)
August 3 - August 10