Lectures meet just one time, for two hours.

Courses

2019 Spring2019 Summer2019 Fall
OF 0004.126 The Beatles' Historic 1964 North American Tour: A Backstage View

The Beatles’ earth-shaking 1964 tour of North America turned the entertainment business on its ear and forever changed the landscape of concert touring. This multimedia lecture will cover perspectives from the group’s inner circle, the promoters, hucksters, AM radio “Boss” DJs, photographers and, of course, the fans. We’ll explore the inner workings of the tour — a staggering 32 shows in 26 venues in 24 cities in just 33 days — and some controversies and wild predictions that followed the Fab Four all over the continent.

Format: 50% Lecture, 10% Interactive discussion, 40% Multimedia

Course Date(s)

Register
OF 0004.127 Social Climate Change: Socializing in an Age of Political Correctness
Social Climate Change: Socializing in an Age of Political Correctness

Remember some of the words used and jokes made when we were growing up? Can you imagine the reaction if such language were used today? How did we become so sensitive as a society? As we struggle to be both social and socially sensitive, what topics are off limits? Are there words we should never use? Are there still “safe spaces” where we can speak freely? Explore how conversation has evolved over the last few decades, and how to safely have a polite conversation. With humor and caution, we’ll identify topics that are still safe, and those you should avoid like the plague.

Format: 70% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)

Register
Instructors
Wendy Patrick
OF 0004.128 Women Who Brought Art, Beauty, and Culture to Early 20th Century San Diego

Lydia Knapp Horton and the Wednesday Club established San Diego’s Carnegie Library, and architect Hazel Wood Waterman designed the club’s building (Ivy Lane at Sixth). Anna Held’s Green Dragon Colony in La Jolla was filled with artists and musicians — mostly women — including philanthropist Ellen Browning Scripps, who lived there while her house was being built. Kate Sessions provided landscaping for the city. Katherine Tingley created the theosophical Lomaland community in Point Loma. We’ll look at the lives of these and many other women who left their indelible mark on San Diego.

Format: 70% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)

Register
Instructors
Rosanne Goodwin
2019 Summer
OF 0004.130 Andrew Jackson, America's Original Populist President

Our nation’s seventh president, hero of the Battle of New Orleans and co-founder of the Democratic Party, fought Indians, barely survived a duel, and stood firm against South Carolina’s threat to secede. Considered the “people’s president,” Andrew Jackson opposed the National Bank, defied the Supreme Court, and supported the Indian Removal Act. Learn about the fascinating life of our first populist president, how he set precedents for the use of presidential power, and how it affects the presidency even to this day.

Format: 70% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
June 17 - June 17
2019 Summer
OF 0004.131 What Autonomous Vehicles Can Do for You: Mobility for All

Have you been wondering what transportation of the future will look like? Are you apprehensive about giving control of a vehicle to technology? How can autonomous (driverless) and connected (smart) vehicles be beneficial to all? What could your involvement be? We’ll explore these and other questions about what researchers, technology companies, and transportation agencies are doing to prepare for the advent of new ways to travel.

Format: 30% Lecture, 70% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
June 21 - June 21
$15
Instructors
Lima Saft
2019 Summer
OF 0004.132 Africa: Home of Natural Wonders and a Wonderful Vacation Destination

In southern Africa, on the Zambezi River at the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe, is one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World — Victoria Falls. In this interactive lecture, learn all about the wonders of this great continent and how to vacation like kings and queens — from Cape Town to Cairo, Asmara to Dakar, Mbabane to Tunis, Maputo to Timbuktu, and Nairobi to Monrovia — without spending a fortune.

Format: 50% Lecture, 20% Interactive discussion, 10% Hands-on activity, 20% Demonstration

Course Date(s)
July 9 - July 9
2019 Summer
OF 0004.133 The Doctor's Dilemma: Medical Decisions Based on Uncertain Data

Modern medicine has nearly doubled the human lifespan. Despite successes, the public is rightly concerned when medical guidelines change. You are now told to take more vitamin D, less calcium, and to avoid large doses of vitamin E — very different from the advice years ago. There are many reasons for these changes. Some medical studies prove to be fraudulent; some are chance observations that fail to reproduce. Learn how to evaluate the latest claims and improve the chance that medical decisions based on uncertain data will work.

Format: 60% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion, 10% Demonstration

Course Date(s)
July 11 - July 11
2019 Summer
OF 0004.134 The USS Midway CV-41

The USS Midway CV-41 served 47 years as an active aircraft carrier before it became a successful museum. Learn the history of this mighty warship, and how it evolved to become the most popular attraction in San Diego. Also learn the most efficient way to tour this vast museum. In a raffle drawing, six students will win guest passes to the museum.

Format: 70% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
July 13 - July 13
2019 Summer
OF 0004.135 International Human Rights Law

Learn why and how individuals in a state-centric global legal system have human rights, and the sources and limitations of international law. You’ll also see how the International Bill of Human Rights constrains authoritarian regimes; and the connection with, and differences between, International Human Rights Law and the Laws of War. You’ll be better equipped to recognize when news commentators and writers conflate terms like genocide and ethnic cleansing; and the degree to which race, gender, childhood, sexual orientation, and religion are/are not protected by internationally derived norms.

Format: 70% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
July 19 - July 19
2019 Summer
OF 0004.136 Clara Breed, Takeo Takei, and the San Diego Public Library Historical Children’s Books Collection

Discover the story of the Clara Breed Historical Children’s Collection, currently held at the SDSU Love Library, comprised of titles from her personal collection and books she curated for the San Diego Public Library where she was a children’s librarian and director. Her collection includes the works of Takei Takeo, Toten Hozumi, Don Emblen, Don Freeman, Dorothy Lathrop, and Leo Politi. Breed’s story as a fighter for the rights of Japanese-American children interned during World War II is documented in the film and book, Dear Miss Breed.

Format: 60% Lecture, 40% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
July 24 - July 24
$15
Instructors
Linda Salem
2019 Summer
OF 0004.137 Drums: The History of All That Shakes, Rattles, and Rolls

Why do we drum? What is the connective tissue that binds us as a family, as a tribe, as humans? Explore the aural landscapes of a heartbeat through percussion instruments from the dawn of time to modern days. Through lectures, presentations, and interactive activities, we’ll travel the globe to get a kinetic understanding of the connections between body, dance, and drums. Participants are encouraged to bring a drum or percussion instrument if available, but not required for this lecture.

Format: 35% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion, 35% Hands-on activity

Course Date(s)
July 25 - July 25
2019 Summer
OF 0004.138 Planetary Geology: An Overview of the Planets of Our Solar System

You are part of the solar system, in a corner of the Milky Way galaxy, in this vast, inexorably moving universe. In this lecture, we’ll explore the wonderful makings of the planets of our solar system, including our Sun, as well as minor constituents such as asteroids and comets. We’ll learn how they all originated and of what materials they’re made. A special focus will be dedicated to our own beautiful planet Earth. Get ready for a fun voyage through geologic time.

Format: 80% Lecture, 20% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
July 26 - July 26
2019 Summer
OF 0004.139 Is This Any Way to Elect a President? The Costs and Benefits of the Electoral College System

Critics of the 2000 and 2016 presidential elections have attacked the Electoral College as obsolete and undemocratic. They see it as a ticking time bomb, which invites questions as to whether the United States is the kind of democracy it encourages other countries to be. Despite these issues, the Electoral College has ensured that U.S. citizens continue to choose presidents when almost one-third of elections have not produced a popular majority. Examine the origin and development of our Electoral College system, a cost-benefit analysis, and the lack of a successful model for reform efforts.

Format: 60% Lecture, 25% Interactive discussion, 15% Hands-on activity

Course Date(s)
July 29 - July 29
$15
Instructors
James Ingram
2019 Summer
OF 0004.140 A Struggle for Power: The First Great War

Did the first World War result from the assassination of the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne? Or was it the conclusion to over 100 years of deadly battles between England and France in the New World of America, in Africa, and the European home front while Russia gobbled up territory across Eastern Europe, the Balkans, and Asia? With rare photographs and information from recently declassified documents, this lecture explores the long, bloody road leading to the war to end all wars.

Format: 70% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
July 30 - July 30
2019 Fall
OF 0004.141 Rebuilding the Nation after the Civil War

Explore how the American people confronted the near demise of the nation in the mid-19th century. Contemplate alternative solutions that the North could have undertaken instead of war; learn about the key moments and people that shaped the Reconstruction; as well as the role played by race and the economy, and why it would take another century to begin to right the wrongs.

Format: 80% Lecture, 20% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
August 1 - August 1
$15
Instructors
John Putman
2019 Fall
OF 0004.142 Whales and Dolphins of California: A Photographic Journey

Can you tell the difference between a fin whale and a blue whale? How about a quick ID on a Pacific white-sided dolphin? Learn the basics for identifying some of the many spectacular marine mammals that live off the coast of California, as well as economical driving trips and the best landings for whale watching. Also, learn how to safely approach marine mammals for the best picture opportunities, and get photo tips from a professional marine life photographer.

Format: 40% Lecture, 60% Visual presentation

Course Date(s)
August 6 - August 6
2019 Fall
OF 0004.143 Red, White, and Bard! A Celebration of William Shakespeare in America

This solo performance celebrates actor-educator Rob Crisell’s more than two decades of devotion to the works of William Shakespeare. Using humor, wit, stuffed animals, a slide show, and a few surprises, Crisell shows you how to “crack Shakespeare’s code”; the importance of verbs; and how Shakespeare influenced Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, and others. He’ll also share his personal Shakespearean journey, which began with a disinterest in high school, avoidance in college, and finally falling in love with the Bard during a year in northeast Pennsylvania. Prepare for Shakespeare to be exciting, approachable, intelligible, and memorable.

Format: 70% Lecture/Performance, 10% Interactive discussion, 20% Audience participation

Course Date(s)
August 7 - August 7
2019 Fall
OF 0004.144 Man-Made Earthquakes in the Age of Unconventional Oil and Gas Development

Yes! Humans really are causing earthquakes! Discover how the recent oil and gas revolution has led to unintended earthquakes of unprecedented proportions across the United States, including our own backyard. Learn about the history of man-made earthquakes and — through a live demonstration — the physics of the problem. We’ll also discuss how our scientific understanding of the subject matter has evolved with time.

Format: 80% Lecture, 10% Interactive discussion, 10% Demonstration

Course Date(s)
August 8 - August 8