Lectures meet just one time, for two hours.

Courses

2018 Spring2018 Summer2018 Fall
2018 Summer
OF 0004.47 Our Water, Our Future

Ever wondered what the earth would be like in a water crisis, or why water management projects often fail? Join us to learn basic concepts of hydraulics and hydrology, main water uses, impacts of population growth and rapid urbanization on water quantity and quality, causes of floods and droughts, surface water and ocean pollution, the effects of climate change on water supply, and sustainable development. See how water resources planners affect our futures and our children’s.

Format: 40% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion, 20% Hands-on activity, 10% Demonstration

Course Date(s)
June 6 - June 6
2018 Summer
OF 0004.49 Diving Seals and Wandering Whales: The Past, Present, and Future of San Diego’s Marine Mammal Community

Presently, several pinniped species and nearly three dozen dolphin and whale species occupy San Diego waters. Four million years ago, our coast was inhabited by a rich diversity of marine mammals including toothless walrus and beluga, species that today live in polar latitudes. Plant-eating sea cows were also present, restricted today to warmer waters. Fossil river dolphin also swam along our coast, but its relatives today are found only in semitropical fresh-water habitats. Learn how changing climates and geography have affected the response of marine mammals to environmental challenges, and the implications for the future health of our marine ecosystem.

Format: 70% Lecture, 10% Interactive discussion, 20% Hands-on activity

Course Date(s)
June 6 - June 6
2018 Summer
OF 0004.50 Atomic Culture in Early Cold War America

Ever wonder why Duck and Cover drills and mutant monsters came to mark the early Cold War era in the United States? We’ll explore the impact of the nuclear age on American society in the wake of Hiroshima and Nagasaki — how attitudes toward the atom and the atom bomb evolved with the changing nature of the Cold War, including calls for a world government; and Hollywood’s treatment of the nuclear age.

Format: 70% Lecture, 15% Interactive discussion, 15% Film clips

Course Date(s)
June 7 - June 7
$15
Instructors
John Putman
2018 Summer
OF 0004.58 How We Elect Politicians in an Age of Instant Information, and Instant Gratification

We’ll examine how political elections are won and lost based largely on instantly available information, often before it’s fact-checked, corroborated, or even verified. We’ll consider what this means for American politics — how jumping to conclusions can jeopardize the voting process — and explore potential solutions.

Format: 70% Lecture, 20% Interactive discussion, 10% Hands-on activity

Course Date(s)
June 9 - June 9
2018 Summer
OF 0004.59 Nicolo Machiavelli: The Dark Prince?

Nicolo Machiavelli is one of history’s most fascinating and enigmatic figures. A product of Renaissance Italy, this philosopher and statesman authored one of the most enduring books on political philosophy, The Prince. Although lionized by a few, Machiavelli’s political principles have been greatly scorned and his name has become synonymous with the worst in politics. But he was, in fact, a political genius, an extraordinary philosopher, and above all, an idealistic Italian patriot. We’ll examine how Machiavelli and his views were the product of the turbulent times in which he lived, and how many of his political and diplomatic schemes are still being played out on today’s geopolitical stage.

Format: 90% Lecture, 10% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
June 8 - June 8
$15
Instructors
Bruno Leone
2018 Summer
OF 0004.60 Women’s Literature in the Franco Era

We’ll look at the literature of female authors during the dictatorship of Francisco Franco, the military general who ruled over Spain from 1939 until his death in 1975. We’ll discuss several novels, and explore the symbolism used to escape censorship, and the meaning of those symbols in Franco’s society.

Format: 50% Lecture, 40% Interactive discussion, 10% Hands-on activity

Course Date(s)
June 13 - June 13
$15
Instructors
Sarah Heras
2018 Summer
OF 0004.62 1968: The Year the Dream Died

Arguably the most remarkable year in American history is 1968. Fifty years ago, Americans witnessed profound events — from the Tet Offensive and assassination of important leaders to the election of Richard Nixon, which marked the end of ’60s optimism. This lecture will explore the numerous profound events in a single year that would contribute greatly to the end of liberalism and the rise of the New Right. Students will revisit many of the important events and experiences that shaped their own lives.

Format: 70% Lecture, 15% Interactive discussion, 15% Hands-on activity

Course Date(s)
June 14 - June 14
$15
Instructors
John Putman
2018 Summer
OF 0004.63 Meet the Men and Women Who Created Modern San Diego, 1909 to 1925

Meet the strong personalities who created modern San Diego and the Panama–California Exposition — their many squabbles as well as the crucial times they banded together to accomplish remarkable things. Understand the role of water and transportation in shaping the city; what brought the Navy here; the city’s role in the free speech fights of the Industrial Workers of the World labor movement; and how climate and agriculture were promoted for making San Diego a paradise.

Format: 70% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
June 22 - June 22
2018 Summer
OF 0004.64 Personal Identity: Is There a Real ‘You’?

We tend to believe that we remain the same person throughout our lives and that there is a permanent and real self at the core of each and every one of us. But is this really true? Some thinkers, both ancient and contemporary, have claimed that, far from being the same person over time, there is no real “you” to begin with. We’ll explore arguments and evidence for and against the existence of “you.”

Format: 70% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
June 29 - June 29
$15
Instructors
Matthew Wion
2018 Summer
OF 0004.65 The Labyrinth of Personal and Collective Memory

How do groups construct collective memories on the basis of individual experiences? How are individual memories influenced by collective understandings of historical realities? Why do societies and individuals preserve some memories but not others? When is it ethical to remember what has been done to us and when does it become destructive? What are the memories that should not be lost for future generations? Explore your memories in writing and class interactions, and discuss the implications of the intersection of personal and collective memories. Gain new perspectives on the accumulation of memories that are part of all mature lives.

Format: 60% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion, 10% Hands-on Activity

Course Date(s)
July 9 - July 9
2018 Summer
OF 0004.66 The Art and Science of Glass

Glass art is ancient yet timeless, with archaeological evidence that the Egyptians were familiar with glass fusing techniques by 2000 BCE. We’ll explore the anthropology, geology, chemistry, physics, culture and endless possibilities of glass art. Fusing in particular surged in popularity in the early 20th century, particularly in the U.S. during the 1960s. We’ll also look at how this widespread hobby is also gaining popularity in the world of fine art. Instructor and glass artist Keith Wahl will raffle off one of his unique pieces.

Format: 70% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
July 12 - July 12
$15
Instructors
Keith Wahl
2018 Summer
OF 0004.67 A Journey into Swahili

Whether you realize it or not, you probably know some Swahili. After identifying the words or phrases that are known by the group, we’ll examine the origins of this East African language and its role today both in Africa and the United States (e.g. Kwanza, The Lion King). You’ll hear about some Swahili language structures and — because of its excellent sound/symbol correspondence — practice reading short passages. We’ll also examine songs and fables to identify words that sound familiar (e.g. baraka), and we’ll sing a song in Swahili.

Format: 30% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion, 40% Hands-on activity

Course Date(s)
July 13 - July 13
$15
Instructors
Ann Johns
2018 Summer
OF 0004.68 Climate Law & Policy

Gain an understanding of the basic concepts in the climate change debate including scientific consensus, the role of media, and types of policies. We’ll discuss seminal court cases relating to climate change, analyze federal and state statutes on the subject, and track current climate legislation. We’ll also explore environmental justice, the “balance bias,” and how public opinion shapes policy.

Format: 70% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
July 17 - July 17
$15
Instructors
Kath Rogers
2018 Summer
OF 0004.70 Mozart’s Don Giovanni in the Age of #MeToo

What can a 200-year-old opera about a policeman’s statue coming to life seeking vengeance against a charming but lecherous aristocrat tell us about today? Everything, really — especially in this dynamic time of women uniting and demanding justice for sexual misconduct. We’ll explore Mozart’s powerful Don Giovanni — listening to examples from the piano, famous recordings, and having class volunteers take character roles and read parts of the libretto. In the process, we’ll learn the basic components of opera and how Mozart made these established conventions work with such expressive power.

Format: 25% Lecture, 20% Interactive discussion, 15% Hands-on activity, 40% Demonstration

Course Date(s)
July 24 - July 24
2018 Summer
OF 0004.71 XETV/CW6: Roadkill on the Digital Highway

On May 31, 2017, Bay City Television closed its doors in San Diego after 64 years. Bay City was the U.S. arm of a binational group operating XETV Channel 6 and, although licensed to Mexico, it served local audiences as ABC, FOX, and CW network affiliates. We will explore how this unique arrangement came to be, all the obstacles XETV overcame, and its eventual demise through bad decisions by local management, corporate short-termism, and the changing world of local broadcasting.

Format: 65% Lecture, 35% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
July 26 - July 26
2018 Summer
OF 0004.72 A Neighborhood in Flames: The Crash of PSA Flight 182 and Its Aftermath

On Sept. 25, 1978, San Diego witnessed one of the worst commercial airline disasters in American aviation history. Experience a step-by-step contextual causal analysis of the crash, the destruction it brought to a quiet North Park neighborhood, and how San Diegans heroically responded. Also learn how the crash — still the worst in California aviation history — led to technological and procedural improvements that are still in use today. For those who witnessed the crash or its aftermath and are still haunted, the class discussion may act as a catharsis.

Format: 70% Lecture, 25% Interactive discussion, 5% Demonstration

Course Date(s)
August 1 - August 1
2018 Summer
OF 0004.73 Chaos and Fractals: Why Can’t We Beat the Roulette?

Explore the conundrum between determinism and randomness through the concept of chaos and its beautiful fractal signatures. The laws of physics dictate that if one knows all forces acting on a system, then its future evolution is strictly determined by its initial configuration. Yet why do certain systems display apparently unpredictable behavior? For example, is a coin toss a random event? Can we predict the roulette? The topic is fascinating.

Format: 75% Lecture, 10% Interactive discussion, 15% Demonstration

Course Date(s)
August 8 - August 8
2018 Summer
OF 0004.74 Emotional First Aid: Practical Actions to Help Those in Crisis

Get the tools you need to support those in crisis. Knowing what to say, what not to say, and how to provide support are not intuitive skills. Through discussion and exercises, you’ll learn how to be an immediate and helpful presence, and how to prevent secondary emotional injuries. Do you know why it’s dangerous to ask “Are you okay?” There’s a better, more helpful question to ask. Don’t be surprised if these techniques and skills improve communication with family members as well.

Format: 50% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion, 10% Hands-on activity, 10% Demonstration

Course Date(s)
August 3 - August 3