Lectures meet just one time, for two hours.

Courses

2018 Fall2019 Spring2019 Summer
OF 0004.101 The San Andreas Fault : So Near and So Silent

What is the San Andreas Fault? Why is it here? What can it do to us when it moves? Discover why California is tectonically active, and how to mitigate the natural hazards we face in the San Diego region. Learn how to recognize the types of plate boundaries and geological hazards, their relative strengths and special distribution in California, and how they interact with humans. We will specifically explore the type and strength of the tectonic boundary here in San Diego.

Format: 70% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)

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OF 0004.102 Detecting Deception: Reading People and Judging Credibility

In an entertaining and interactive format, learn how to spot deception within a broad spectrum of personality types, in a variety of situations. This course uses scientific research to demonstrate the most effective techniques in judging credibility. Learn how to perceive inconsistencies between language, behavior, voice, and appearance; and how to determine which information is most reliable. Recognize and resist using stereotypes when assessing credibility.

Format: 60% Lecture, 20% Interactive discussion, 10% Hands-on activity, 10% Demonstration

Course Date(s)

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Instructors
Wendy Patrick
OF 0004.103 Effectively Dealing with Difficult People

Enhance your ability to communicate with a wide variety of difficult people by altering the way you perceive and respond to temperament and behavior. This program applies the techniques and methods discussed in two of Dr. Patrick’s books, Reading People and Red Flags. Learn how to recognize patterns in behavior that reveal underlying agendas, fears, and concerns; and how to respond accordingly. This includes proactively establishing common ground with challenging people to facilitate bonding and build trust.

Format: 60% Lecture, 20% Interactive discussion, 20% Demonstration

Course Date(s)

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Instructors
Wendy Patrick
2019 Spring
OF 0004.104 The Mexican-American War and How It Shaped Two Nations

California and the southwest United States became U.S. territory following the Mexican War, or as some Mexicans refer to it, the “war where you stole our country.” The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo cost Mexico over half of its territory, while transforming the United States into a bicoastal country. Was it a war justified by “manifest destiny” and Mexican transgressions or was it essentially a land grab? Professor Blaine Davies explores the causes, the battles, and the aftermath of the Mexican War, including the Battle of San Pasqual, the biggest battle of the Mexican War fought in California.

Format: 95% Lecture, 5% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
February 20 - February 20
2019 Spring
OF 0004.105 Repacking Relationships as We Age

Research confirms what we already know intuitively — strong relationships are the key to healthy aging. Whether married or single, with or without children, surrounded by a large social network or just a few friends, how we connect with others as we transition into this new phase of our lives will play a major role in the well-being of our bodies and minds. This is an ideal time to ask courageous questions about our current relationships. Learn how to assess them, let go of draining ones, and cultivate positive ones. Leave with a vision and plan for creating nourishing, loving connections.

Format: 50% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion, 20% Hands-on activity

Course Date(s)
March 6 - March 6
2019 Spring
OF 0004.106 Kate Sessions' World Wide Web of Horticulture

Have you ever noticed the statue of Kate O. Sessions in Balboa Park? She is locally known as “the Mother of Balboa Park,” but this pioneering businesswoman was internationally famous. Learn how this small-town nursery owner and garden designer became the only woman in 60 years to win a Meyer Medal for horticultural achievement. Also meet a cast of leading horticulturalists with whom Sessions networked. This course is based on a lecture that was presented at the Huntington Library in San Marino, and includes new research on Sessions.

Format: 90% Lecture, 10% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
March 7 - March 7
OF 0004.107 Theodore Roosevelt: American President/Global Leader

The 26th president of the United States is often considered the first “modern” president. More than any other national leader or individual American, Theodore Roosevelt is responsible for America’s rise to world leadership status. Conservationist, soldier, statesman, scholar, Nobel Prize winner, and Medal of Honor recipient, he remains one of America’s best models of presidential, global, and executive leadership. Visionary, crisis manager, charismatic communicator, strategic thinker, negotiator and decision maker, he was the most distinguished and accomplished leader of his age. We will evaluate our presidents and other leaders to see how they compare with Roosevelt.

Format: 50% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion, 20% Multimedia

Course Date(s)

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Instructors
David Rader
2019 Spring
OF 0004.108 Walking the Camino: A Pilgrimage across Northern Spain

Discover the Camino de Santiago, a network of medieval pilgrimage paths established to honor the Apostle St. James. Learn about the Camino’s history and see the variety of Spanish landscapes that pilgrims walk through to reach their destination of Santiago de Compostela. With over 300,000 walkers in 2017, these historical paths have captured the imagination of 21st century adventurers. Come explore the culture and architecture along several different routes and understand what it’s like to be a walker. Artist and Camino trekker Amanda Schaffer will share her experiences and offer tips on planning for this often life-changing journey.

Format: 75% Lecture, 25% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
March 16 - March 16
2019 Spring
OF 0004.109 A Primer for Retirement and Investment Basics Part 2 | Outlook and Opportunities: Separate the Noise from the Signal

With information that is updated quarterly, we’ll explore today’s stock market volatility and opportunities in the current environment.

Format: 20% Lecture, 60% Hands-on activity, 20% Demonstration

Course Date(s)
March 20 - March 20
2019 Spring
OF 0004.111 8,000 Days of Retirement

What will you do in retirement? Most of us have a clear image of day one, maybe even day 1,000. But few can imagine 8,000 days of golf or traveling. Instead of planning for retirement as a single state, it may be beneficial to re-frame it to reflect four phases — Honeymoon, Big Decision, Navigating Longevity, and Solo Journey. We’ll look at the tasks and issues we’re most likely to be managing in each phase of retirement, from transportation and home maintenance, to a social network that reinforces a healthy and active lifestyle. Leave with a clear vision of your retirement, what to anticipate, and how to plan for it.

Format: 60% Lecture, 25% Hands-on activity, 15% Demonstration

Course Date(s)
March 26 - March 26
2019 Spring
OF 0004.112 Qi Gung for Health

Excellent for improving balance, joint mobility, and overall health, Qi Gung, or “Energy Work,” has been practiced in China for centuries. Part of the teachings that eventually became the famous martial art Tai Chi Chuan, Qi Gung consists of body movements paired with focused breathing and one’s imagination, to improve the flow and connection to Qi, the universal life energy. Students of all ages and levels of physical ability are welcome; workouts will be tailored to individual needs. Please wear comfortable clothing and lightweight shoes.

Format: 20% Lecture, 60% Hands-on activity, 20% Demonstration

Course Date(s)
March 29 - March 29
2019 Spring
OF 0004.113 The Army's Benevolence in San Diego's Naval Disaster: The 1905 Explosion of USS Bennington

Death was charitable among sailors aboard the gunboat USS Bennington, at anchor on San Diego Bay, July 21, 1905, when her main and forward boilers let loose. Clouds of black steam and the scent of death rose over the waterfront. Bennington shuddered and steam hissed at deafening pitch, filling every compartment. Days later, a convoy of wagons laboring under the weight of 47 coffins pressed north through the city toward the Post Cemetery. Learn what went so terribly wrong that 66 crewmen should die, and how a city and nation mourned one of the Navy’s worst peacetime disasters. Scanlon will give an overview of this lecture at the March 27 OLLI Café.

Format: 60% Lecture, 40% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
April 11 - April 11
2019 Spring
OF 0004.114 Lighthouses of San Diego

Six lighthouses have affected maritime traffic into and out of San Diego since 1855. Who were the keepers who kept the lights burning on Point Loma? Enjoy a detailed photographic look and hear some whimsical tales of life at San Diego’s lighthouses. Many of the photos are from the family albums of former keepers. Their narratives recall life within the protective arms of a military reservation, indelibly linked to war efforts. We’ll also look at how lighthouse optics work, and the types of lenses used in lanterns locally and some of the giants in operation in Europe. Fahlen and Scanlon will give an overview of this lecture at the March 27 OLLI Café.

Optional Tour of the Old Point Loma Lighthouse at Cabrillo National Monument: The entrance fee is $15 per carload. The address is 1800 Cabrillo Memorial Dr., San Diego, CA 92106.

Format: 70% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
April 25 - April 25
2019 Spring
OF 0004.115 Satan Made Me Do It! The Source of Evil in the Old Testament

There are only rare appearances of Satan (the “devil”) in the Old Testament. We will look at those appearances and explore how the people of the Old Testament explained the presence of evil in their world, and how their idea grew and developed over time. Where does this idea of a separate source of evil come from and what is the relationship of God to this evil? To fill out the picture, we will examine some of the “intertestamental literature” that was produced after the Old Testament and before the New Testament.

Format: 60% Lecture, 40% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
April 26 - April 26
$15
Instructors
John Spencer
2019 Summer
OF 0004.116 Advance-Care Planning at Any Age

Engage in thought provoking discussions about what gives your life meaning, and learn approachable ways to have important advance-care planning discussions with your parents, children, and physician. We’ll discuss engaging and even funny case studies about what happens in the clinical setting when these discussions are properly had and not had.

Format: 60% Lecture, 30% Interactive discussion, 10% Hands-on activity

Course Date(s)
May 7 - May 7
2019 Summer
OF 0004.117 California: Hotbed for Sexual Trafficking of Children

What is human trafficking? What is child sex trafficking? Get a broad overview of ongoing research on the topic, with a focus on Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children (CSEC) and Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking (DMST). Learn about the impacts of CSEC in California; and current federal, state, and local efforts to address the wide variety of issues associated with sex trafficking. Also learn about the move toward a multi-system response to working with trafficking victims.

Format: 25% Lecture, 25% Interactive discussion, 25% Hands-on activity, 25% Demonstration

Course Date(s)
May 7 - May 7
2019 Summer
OF 0004.118 San Diego’s Forgotten “Garden of the Dead”

At the base of Presidio Hill in Presidio Park is a largely forgotten area known as the Franciscan Gardens. Dedicated on July 16, 1935 as El Jardín del Rey, The King’s Garden was where members of the Sacred Expedition, including Father Junípero Serra, gathered on July 1, 1769 to plan Spain’s occupation of Alta California. It is reportedly the gravesite to over 80 expedition members. In this lecture, we’ll analyze the historic evidence and consider which factors — fatigue, malnutrition, illness, disease, or conflict with the native population — were the possible causes of death, and whether or not the remains are still there. We’ll visit the Garden on Saturday, May 11.

Format: 75% Lecture, 25% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
May 8 - May 8
2019 Summer
OF 0004.119 Death-Penalty Cases in a Traffic-Court Setting

A seasoned immigration judge once described her job as “doing death-penalty cases in a traffic-court setting.” While immigration policy has dominated the news this past year, many of the events sparking public outrage have shed light on long-standing systems and procedures that make up the immigration system in the U.S. This course will provide a close look in what due process and constitutional protections mean in the immigration context — exploring immigration courts, enforcement agencies, criminalization, detention, family separation, and the refugee and asylum process.

Format: 50% Lecture, 25% Interactive discussion, 20% Hands-on activity, 5% Demonstration

Course Date(s)
May 10 - May 10
2019 Spring
OF 0004.120 Trade Deficit versus Surplus: Definitions, Turths, and Myths

In recent years, the words “trade deficit” have been frequently used in the political arena and mass media. In layman terms, based on current events, this lecture will cover the truths and myths of trade deficit and surplus, and whether they are “good” or “bad.” Gain a better understanding of the implications of trade policies.

Format: 60% Lecture, 40% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
February 25 - February 25
$15
Instructors
Jaemin Kim
2019 Spring
OF 0004.121 A Primer for Retirement and Investment Basics Part 1 | Standing Guard: Protect What You’ve Worked For

Learn strategies to help guard valuable assets and your pre- and post-retirement income. We’ll discuss withdrawal strategies, the impact of longevity and inflation, and rising long-term care and health-care costs.

Format: 20% Lecture, 60% Hands-on activity, 20% Demonstration

Course Date(s)
March 13 - March 13
2019 Spring
OF 0004.125 Writing and Making a Sci-Fi Comedy: How Attack of the Killer Tomatoes Came to Be

In 1978, Attack of the Killer Tomatoes burst into American pop culture when the movie premiered in San Diego. Three other Killer Tomatoes movies followed, along with a cartoon show, games, and toys. Costa Dillon, the creator and writer of the films, will look at how they came into being, and the process and perils of writing a science fiction comedy. Through film clips and production photos, get a behind-the-scenes look at how the original film was made on a shoestring budget by true Hollywood outsiders. We’ll explore the unexpected popularity of the movie and what it means to be a cult film.

Format: 75% Lecture, 25% Interactive discussion

Course Date(s)
March 19 - March 19